Saturday, March 7, 2020

The Gentle Barbarian, Turgenev Essay Example

The Gentle Barbarian, Turgenev Essay Example The Gentle Barbarian, Turgenev Essay The Gentle Barbarian, Turgenev Essay In 1870s Turgenev was known in Europe as the conducting Russian novelist, but he was far to not be known to the large public in Europe or America. In 1877 he has become world famous after the publication of Virgin Soil, his longest and most ambitious novel. In one month after the publication, fifty-two young people were arrested in Russia on accusations of revolutionary conspiracy. This incident the public in America and France was shaken. Its effect on American readers was so enormous: as powerful, in its way, as the effect of Uncle Toms Cabin had been. For Turgenev the novel was one more attempt to present the Russian situation with detachment, and above all he sought to show to his critics that he had not lost touch with the younger generation.; (V. S. Pritchett). Some years ago the British writer and critic V.S. Pritchett asked: What is it that attracts us to the Russian novelists of the nineteenth century? What Pritchett was voicing was the obvious truth that the Russian writer s touch and move us with immediacy, a sense of freshness and vitality that we do not always find in Western literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Turgenev creates moving novels that depict life in Russia. We respond to Russian writers, as we typically do not to most Anglo-Saxon writers. Turgenev evokes such a strong a sense of reality that readers with no particular passion for literature accept without qualification his vision of life. Some tentative answers to Pritchetts question may provide us with some understanding of why so much of the pessimistic literature of this century has failed to engage our deepest sympathies, our most profound sense of life. One of the most obvious characteristics of Russian fiction in the nineteenth century is the astonishing way in which characters talk about themselves and others. In his book on Turgenev, The Gentle Barbarian, Pritchett writes: It is the nature of Dostoevskys genius to

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Policy message to the public Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Policy message to the public - Assignment Example There are practices which have been proven to reduce the chances of home robberies by a significant factor. The research findings by the Department of Justice in US, indicate that in every 15 seconds, American homes are victims of burglary. Below are some of the ways through which home robbery can be reduced:- One of the fundamental practices of home burglary prevention is by ensuring that you lock all the outside doors when leaving home. When some of the doors are left open, it may lead to unplanned robbery. While most of the robberies are planned, sometimes leaving doors open may trigger a robbery that would not otherwise have occurred. By locking your home, also makes it difficult for the burglars to break into. As emphasized by FEEMEY & WEIR (1975) in their journal, it is important to install a properly working alarm in one’s house. The alarms not only act to scare the burglars off, but also to seek help from neighbors and any policemen on patrol. When a person raises alarm, the chances of the burglary succeeding are paralyzed. Another robbery prevention practice is by leaving lights on when going out. Reports indicate that home robberies occur mostly when the house is not lit. It is therefore, advisable to always leave the security lighting on, when always. The lights lower robbery chances, by not creating a conducive environment for burglary to execute their activities. Security cameras are another important precautionary measure in the prevention of home burglary. Security cameras can be used for living inspection of the areas around and within the house, and hence making it possible to see any person outside the house, before opening doors for them. They are also important in tracking down the burglars after the crime. The footages of the robbers can be presented to the police officers for the search and arrest of the criminals. Do not open doors to persons you do not

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Japanese Social, Political and Economic Development Research Paper

Japanese Social, Political and Economic Development - Research Paper Example Background According to the discussion by Roman A Cybriwsky, Japanese legend reaffirms that Japan was founded in the 600 BC by the Emperor Jimmu, who was a first ruler and direct descendant of the goddess of the sun and ancestor of the currently ruling imperial family (Cybriwsky, 1994). In AD 405, the Japanese court officially agreed to implement the Chinese writing system. Hand in hand with the introduction of Buddhism in the 6th century, these two events revolutionized Japanese culture and marked the start of a long period of Chinese cultural influence. The history was written down around 400 AD. With the establishment of the first fixed capital at Nara in 710 until 1867, the emperors of the Yamato dynasty were the nominal rulers, but actual power was usually held by influential court nobles, and the military governor’s. Japan, is comprised of islands, which extends along to Pacific coast of Asia (Flath, 2000). There are four main islands, extending from north to south, thes e are Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu and Okinawa Island, which in size measures about 380 miles and lies southwest of Kyushu. In total, there are about 3,000 smaller islands are part of Japan. The total land area of Japan is slightly smaller compared to California. More than 70% of the country is hilly, with a many mountains cutting across the main islands. The country has its highest mountain which is well known as Mt. Fuji (12,388 feet). Because of this, little flat area exists and many hills and valleys are cultivated all in most regions. Japan is located in a volcanic zone along the Pacific depth where low-intensity earth tremors, volcanic activity are felt within the islands. Therefore, harmful earthquakes are bound to occur severally. It is recorded in history that massive earthquake of about magnitude 9.0 in scales and tsunami hit northeastern Japan's Tohoku region on March 11, 2011. This causes hot springs of water to arise, which are many and have been formed as a result . All of these factors make Japan a historically and geographically interesting country. This makes it appealing to tourists, and makes it very noticeable worldwide. People Japan's population is currently about 127 million, this growth rate from the 20th century has emerged as a result of scientific, industrialization, and sociological changes experienced within the country (Broadbent, 1990). However, the birth rates have decreased significantly from the 1970s. In 2005, Japan's population had declined for once, than earlier predicted and in the year 2010, the population growth rate was 1.0%. However, it was observed that better sanitary and health standards produced a life expectancy exceeding by far that of the United States. Japan has developed to an urban society, where we have only about 1% of the labor force engaged in agriculture. Many of the peasant farmers supplement their income with part-time jobs in nearby towns and cities (Broadbent, 1990). Study shows about 80 million o f the urban population is heavily concentrated on the Pacific shore of Honshu and in northern Kyushu. The majority of the population centers include: Metropolitan Tokyo with a population of about 8.9 million; Yokohama with 3.6 million; Osaka with 2.6 million; Nagoya with 2.2 million; Sapporo with 1.8 million; Kyoto and Kobe with 1.5 million each; Kawasaki and Fukuoka with 1.4 million each, and Saitama with 1.2 million (Cybriwsky, 1994).

Monday, January 27, 2020

Sickle Cell Disease Perspective: Genetic Anthology

Sickle Cell Disease Perspective: Genetic Anthology Grayson Jones  Ã‚   Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is inherited which means that the disease is passed by genes from parents to their children. People who have SCD inherit two abnormal hemoglobin genes, one from each parent. SCD has many forms; however, the most common and severe form, sickle cell anemia, overwhelming affects African-Americans and Hispanics in the United States. This paper will analyze SCD; explore the social implications and any genetic advantages; and report on the current societal implications. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body. Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders which have abnormal hemoglobin. SCD is not contagious, like a cold or an infection, and is passed by one gene from each parent to their children. People with SCD have either one or two abnormal hemoglobin S genes. Sickle cell anemia is the disease that describes those with two hemoglobin S genes, hemoglobin SS. Sickle cell trait is the condition where the hemoglobin S gene is inherited from one parent and a normal hemoglobin gene is inherited from the other parent.   People with sickle cell trait are generally healthy and symptom free. Nevertheless, they are carriers of the defective hemoglobin S gene and can pass that defective gene to their children. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institutes (NHLBI) (2016) figure below shows the difference between normal and abnormal red blood cells.   Normal red blood cells contain hemoglobin that is disc shaped which allow cells to provide a steady flow of oxygen to the bodys tissues.   Abnormal red blood cells contain sickle hemoglobin which are not flexible and do not move freely to provide needed oxygen to the bodys tissues. Lack of tissue oxygen causes attacks of severe and sudden pain.   According to the NHLBI (2016), Most children with SCD are pain free between painful crises, but adolescents and adults may also suffer with chronic ongoing pain. The red cell sickling and poor oxygen delivery can also cause organ damage. Over a lifetime, SCD can harm a persons spleen, brain, eyes, lungs, liver, heart, kidneys, penis, joints, bones, or skin. Normal red blood cells live approximately 90 to 120 days while abnormal sickle cells typically last only 10 to 20 days.   This is due to the fact that sickle cells cannot change shape easily and burst apart or hemolyze (NHLBI, 2016).   The human body is continually reproducing new red blood cells to replace old blood cells which mean that a body with SCD has trouble keeping up with demand.   The affect is a lower than normal red blood cell count called anemia. The social implications of Sickle Cell Disease have been seen in a myriad of ways such as caregiving, community perceptions, and the health care system. Since SCD begins prior to birth and affects not only the children but the parents too, a rise in a family based approach to this disease has been seen. Mothers of a children with SCD are living in constant anxiety and stress that their child may become deathly ill at any moment, intense, complex nature of SCD crises as unpredictable, recurring, and potentially severe (Burnes, Antle, Williams, Cook, 2008). The disease can arise and be triggered by a fluctuation in temperatures, stress, lack of sleep, and other factors. Since the symptoms come on suddenly and intensely, then this makes it difficult to predict onset which cause families to live in constant state of fear. In the study, the mothers felt that they are left with all the responsibility and to be the overall caregiver, while the fathers distance themselves from the childs pa in. Another social implication of SCD is the community perception or lack of knowledge of the disease. SCD has not had a significant public awareness in the developing countries where most cases are prevalent, Most mothers had not even heard of SCD, and they did not know how the illness is transmitted (Burnes et al., 2008). The understanding is that women and men are not tested for the sickle cell trait and are not aware of how the disease is spread which has led to stigma about SCD in their cultures. There are many falsehoods about the disease such as contagious, a curse on ones family, or being at fault for having a child who is born with such a physical illness. In addition, a racist assumption of the disease exists and a feeling of being powerless to speaking up about the disease because one does not want to be thought of less than anyone else. The last social implication is what is identified in the health care system. There have been advancements in the treatment of SCD in first world countries, through medication and other treatments; however, ­Ã‚ ­ there is still a lack of treatment possibilities in the areas that are mostly affected by SCD. The overall complaint among families affected by the disease is that there is a lack of knowledge among medical professionals, did not know about SCD or how to treat its symptoms during a crisis (Burnes et al., 2008). Parents going into a hospital and having to tell the staff about treatments is scary. They think that they cannot trust professionals to take care of their child since these professionals lack the required education about such a serious disease. The overall leading social implication of SCD is the lack of knowledge and education that is associated with this disease. The Sickle Cell gene has a genetic protection against Malaria, which is a serious and sometimes deadly infectious disease.   Malaria is caused by a mosquito that is carrying a parasite harmful to humans and the mosquito bites the human. Symptoms include high fevers, chills, and other flu like signs. If a person who is a carrier of one sickle cell gene (heterozygous), has shown signs of lower mortality and morbidity rate among those who may become infected with malaria, Unexpectedly, heterozygous individuals experience some protection from malaria infections. Aidoo et al.(2002), demonstrate reduced mortality and morbidity, Aluoch 1997 reports higher resistance to malaria, whereas Hesran et al.(1999), demonstrate a reduced parasite load for heterozygous carriers of this otherwise damaging gene (Lidell, Oswusu-Brackett, Wallace, 2014).   Heterozygote Protection is when an individual who carries a normal allele and an infected allele are at an advantage and maintain that he terozygote presence in population. This is seen directly, When the malarial protozoan invades the red blood cells of heterozygotes, the parasites cause a relatively large reduction in the oxygen tension within the cells and thus contribute to sickling. The sickling of the red blood cells then impairs the protozoan growth and development (Howe, 2007). This means that the sickled blood cells stop the infection of malaria spreading throughout an individual; the heterozygotes are protecting the body from an infectious disease. The exact number of people living with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) in the United States (US) is not known. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC) (2016), SCD affects approximately 100,000 Americans. SCD occurs among about 1 out of every 365 Black or African-American births. SCD occurs among about 1 out of every 16,300 Hispanic-American births. About 1 in 13 Black or African-American babies is [sic] born with sickle cell trait (SCT). Over the past four (4) decades, the US has made significant progress in the care of people with SCD. Homer and Oyeku (2016) explain the increase in survival rate due to healthcare progress: Even in the absence of the discovery of new medications, median survival has increased dramatically from death typically occurring during early childhood in the 1970s to survival now in the mid-50s for individuals with hemoglobin SS and mid-60s for individuals with hemoglobin SC disease. This progress has been made possible through universal newborn screening, the effective use of penicillin, and more recently of hydroxyurea, careful monitoring, and the provision of supportive care. Testing for SCD is easy and only requires a blood test. Early testing is imperative for diagnosis and early preventative measures to prevent complications. According to the CDC (2016), the US newborn screening program requires every baby to be tested for SCD. Prior to birth, amniotic fluid can be also tested to diagnose SCD. Newborn screening is extremely important and effective so that informed parents can discuss options with their primary care doctor, a hematologist or a genetics counselor. SCD disproportionately affects African-American and Hispanic communities which rely heavily on public healthcare and insurance programs. According to Hassell (2016), SCD therapies which include coordinated care by knowledgeable providers, integrating specialized and routine health care across the life span are not readily available to these targeted groups. A structured system of care is nonexistent for people with SCD. In addition, mounting evidence suggests that therapies of proven benefit, including prophylactic penicillin, transcranial Doppler, and hydroxyurea therapy, are not being utilized (Hassell, 2016). In conclusion, one does not contract SCD, one is born with SCD. This disease is easily identified by a simple blood test and disproportionately affects those people in low-income areas. SCD treatment options are not widely available to those afflicted by the disease. The social and societal implications are far reaching and significantly negatively impact the African-American and Hispanic communities. References Burnes, D. P., Antle, B. J., Williams, C. C., Cook, L. (2008). Mothers Raising Children with Sickle Cell Disease at the Intersection of Race, Gender, and Illness Stigma. Health Social Work, 33(3), 211-220. doi:10.1093/hsw/33.3.211 Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com.nuls.idm.oclc.org/ps/i.do?id=GALE|A184643666v=2.1u=nu_mainit=rp=AONEsw=wauthCount=1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2016). Data Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell/data.html Hassell, K. L. (2016). Sickle Cell Disease A Continued Call to Action. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Volume 51, Issue 1, S1-S2. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.11.002. Retrieved from http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(15)00726-6/fulltext Homer, C. J. Oyeku, S. O. (2016). Sickle Cell Disease A Roadmap for Getting to Excellence Everywhere. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Volume 51, Issue 1, S1-S2. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.10.018. Retrieved from http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(15)00702-3/fulltext Howe, E. M. (2007). Untangling Sickle-cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection. Science Education, 16(1), 1-19. doi:10.1007/s11191-005-4712-7 Retrieved from http://web.a.ebscohost.com.nuls.idm.oclc.org/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=a36e64b9-4230-45e0-accb-db8cdc436af1%40sessionmgr4009vid=1hid=4209 Liddell, C., Owusu-Brackett, N., Wallace, D. (2014). A Mathematical Model of Sickle Cell Genome Frequency in Response to Selective Pressure from Malaria. Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 76(9), 2292-2305.   Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.nuls.idm.oclc.org/docview/1560166043?OpenUrlRefId=info:xri/sid:primoaccountid=25320 United States Department of Health Human Services. National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute (2016). What is Sickle Cell Disease? Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sca

Sunday, January 19, 2020

The Nature of Power Essay -- Power Society Nationalism Essays

The Nature of Power In 1948, the OECD was formed by several European nations in what would become the first step toward the formation of the European Union. The creation of the EU was revolutionary in that nations gave up unprecedented amounts of their sovereignty, resulting in such acts as voluntarily subjecting themselves to monitoring of war materials (coal and steel) and culminating in the institution of the Euro and integration of European economies and societies, and politics. The success of the EU in the last few years is amazing not just because of its economic achievements, but because it signifies the first successful surrender of nationalism and the transfer of loyalty to a regional level, notions which would have been considered impossible at the beginning of the 20th century. Taking into account the strength of nationalism in the 20th century, the phenomena surrounding the formation of the EU are hard to comprehend until the nature of power and its attraction to people is considered. Power plays a large part in human psychology, beginning when the infant cries in order to draw attention to itself and continuing as kids learn exclusion, join cliques, and as adults compete for respect and influence. Power is exercised from the most basic everyday relationships to the international stage. It is the ultimate motivator in society. Accepting this, it is easy to understand that the sacrifices made by the EU were made in the pursuit of greater power through collective unity, which overruled human affiliations with nationalism and the idea of sovereignty. The question we must ask is why power is so powerful a force. Power forms the basis of society because people want to live secure, respected lives. Simmel ... ...rol of an otherwise chaotic existence. Power is the tool for maintaining a stable, and as such a secure life. Once stripped of all excesses and perversions, power comes down to avoiding the unknown and unsafe. It’s all about security. If we can accept that people are naturally predisposed to living secure lives devoid of real danger and instability, it is obvious, especially in these timers, that power is not only the basis of society, but is the one thing constant in life. Sources Cited: Bataille, Georges. Blue of Noon London: Marion Boyars Publishers LTD, 1957 Camus, Albert. The Fall New York: Vintage Books, 1956 Highmore, Ben. Everyday Life and Culture Theory. New York: Routledge, 2002 Kafka, Franz. The Trial New York: Shockden Books, 1998 Quotes Used: Card, Orson Scott. The Crystal City. New York: Tom Doherty Associates, 2003. The Nature of Power Essay -- Power Society Nationalism Essays The Nature of Power In 1948, the OECD was formed by several European nations in what would become the first step toward the formation of the European Union. The creation of the EU was revolutionary in that nations gave up unprecedented amounts of their sovereignty, resulting in such acts as voluntarily subjecting themselves to monitoring of war materials (coal and steel) and culminating in the institution of the Euro and integration of European economies and societies, and politics. The success of the EU in the last few years is amazing not just because of its economic achievements, but because it signifies the first successful surrender of nationalism and the transfer of loyalty to a regional level, notions which would have been considered impossible at the beginning of the 20th century. Taking into account the strength of nationalism in the 20th century, the phenomena surrounding the formation of the EU are hard to comprehend until the nature of power and its attraction to people is considered. Power plays a large part in human psychology, beginning when the infant cries in order to draw attention to itself and continuing as kids learn exclusion, join cliques, and as adults compete for respect and influence. Power is exercised from the most basic everyday relationships to the international stage. It is the ultimate motivator in society. Accepting this, it is easy to understand that the sacrifices made by the EU were made in the pursuit of greater power through collective unity, which overruled human affiliations with nationalism and the idea of sovereignty. The question we must ask is why power is so powerful a force. Power forms the basis of society because people want to live secure, respected lives. Simmel ... ...rol of an otherwise chaotic existence. Power is the tool for maintaining a stable, and as such a secure life. Once stripped of all excesses and perversions, power comes down to avoiding the unknown and unsafe. It’s all about security. If we can accept that people are naturally predisposed to living secure lives devoid of real danger and instability, it is obvious, especially in these timers, that power is not only the basis of society, but is the one thing constant in life. Sources Cited: Bataille, Georges. Blue of Noon London: Marion Boyars Publishers LTD, 1957 Camus, Albert. The Fall New York: Vintage Books, 1956 Highmore, Ben. Everyday Life and Culture Theory. New York: Routledge, 2002 Kafka, Franz. The Trial New York: Shockden Books, 1998 Quotes Used: Card, Orson Scott. The Crystal City. New York: Tom Doherty Associates, 2003.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

80s Fashion Essay

80s Fashion! For many, the 1980s was a great time. The creation of MTV revolutionised fashion, the music industry and even how we watched TV. But for others, it was nothing but bad hair, worse clothing and music often had more to do with machines than talent. The clothes worn in the 80s depicted people who were trying to find themselves. They looked fro ways to express their creativity and individuality.Men wore heavy make-up and grew long hair; for example David Bowie or Boy George. Whilst women wore layers of clothing and short hair cuts. The likes of Madonna and Cindy Lauper rocked this look. Both sexes were looking for an identity. Famous Fashion Trends In the 80s: New Romantic Look, Valley Girl, Power dressing, Leotards and Dance wear and Miami Vice Look were just a few famous trends that people in the eighties wore. New romantic Look:New Wave, New Romantic, and gothic fashion at this time was heavily influenced by punk fashion: the streaky eyeliner, the spiked hair, the outrage ous clothing, some of which derived from bondage wear and some of which (New Romantic) was a nod to long-gone eras. Power Dressing: Shoulder Pads, popularised by Joan Collins and Linda Evans from the soap Opera Dynasty, remained popular throughout the 1980s and even the first three years of the 1990s.The reason behind the sudden popularity of shoulder pads for women in the 1980s may be that women in the workplace were no longer unusual, and wanted to â€Å"power dress† to show that they were the equals of men at the office. Many women's outfits had velcro on the inside of the shoulder where various sized shoulder pads could be attached. Leotards and Dance wear: Leotards had been a fashion trend since the early 1970s, when were first used to add colour and texture under the â€Å"layered look† popular in the middle of that decade.By the end of the decade leotards made from shiny spandex had become the standard feminine fashion of the â€Å"disco era†, partly for their form-fitting quality and the fact that they allowed flexibility and ease of movement. With the arrival of the aerobics craze of the early 1980s the classic leotard moved from the dance floor to the gym, accompanied by matching tights, Leg warmers and elastic headbands. Leotards of the early 1980s boasted bright stripes, polka dots, and even elastic belts.

Friday, January 3, 2020

The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli Analysis - 948 Words

Composed nearly 500 years ago, Niccolo Machiavellis The Prince presents another perspective on the meaning of virtue. Machiavellis definition contended against the idea presented by the Catholic Church. Machiavelli did not force any opinions of his own, somewhat he composed from his experience and whatever theory that prompts activities which created successful results in the political scene of Italy and different nations. While Machiavelli continues to be scrutinized for his thoughts, in all actuality consciously or unconsciously one must understand that humankind is, for the most part, a self-serving species in which thinking only for oneself grants a strategic advantage to the means which goals and tasks are completed. On matters of†¦show more content†¦Then again, he can lead by fear. The most valuable treasure to any human is their life. If somebody is set in a place to lose his or her life, one will do whatever is necessary to preserve it. This method has the value of being under the control of the ruler. Machiavelli has proposed time and time again that have that power to yourself is always ideal instead of offering it to the general population you lead. The underlying reason is that it shows strength and power. People are more inclined to obey when a leader has the qualities to bring repercussions if an order isnt followed. Intimidation and fear are tactics which are obsolete in the modern era. If a leader of the country fails to perform according to expectations, he will be faced with consequences. Either someone new will be selected, or an election will result with an opposing party participating. The whole concept of democracy was to shift the power from a ruler to the mass. People now have a fundamental right to voice their opinions and concerns, and it is part of a healthy democratic system. The Prince states that â€Å"Everyone sees what you appear to be, but few know what you are (Machiavelli 57) which is as valid of a statement in Modern Era as it was during the Renaissance. Across all cultures and societies over the world people always want to have the characteristic of being called good. With that being said, itShow MoreRelatedAnalysis Of The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli832 Words   |  4 PagesNiccolo Machiavelli (1469–1527) has lived in an era when the Florence, Italy had become th e battleground for the foreign forces and was suffering from political destruction. Moreover, an era of the Renaissance was in the process and being a philosopher of renaissance era, he put forward quite controversial theories and philosophies. His comprehensive work The Prince is considered as a remarkable piece of historical writing not only for the age of renaissance but also for the contemporary age. HeRead MoreAnalysis Of The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli871 Words   |  4 PagesThe Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli From the moment a child is born from the womb, they are consistently instructed to follow the strict rules of what is classified as morally correct in order to succeed in life, and yet, The Prince, composed by Niccolo Machiavelli of Florence, goes against every word of these such instructions. The Prince is a historically controversially book written for Lorenzo de Medici, intended to assist him in improving the situations occurring in Italy at the time. In thisRead MoreAnalysis Of The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli1314 Words   |  6 PagesMACHIAVELLI’S LIVED WORLD: SETTING CONTEXT Niccolà ² Machiavelli’s The Prince was written in a time of political and civil unrest in Italy. For decades the city-state of Florence suffered several political uprisings and the establishment of new governments. From tyrannical rule to the creation of a democratic republic, and finally the re-establishment of the Medici family, The Prince comes from Machiavelli’s lived experiences in these political regimes. Machiavelli blames the division of Italy into city-statesRead MoreAnalysis Of The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli1094 Words   |  5 Pageswhen their real personality is revealed. In the nonfiction essay, The Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli, Machiavelli delineates the requirements to be a successful leader over a powerful state. He suggests numerous times that a prince should govern an empire with a image that is dominant but caring for citizens while ruling ruthlessly and appealing to the people if possible. Machiavelli’s principles of a dominant and ruthless prince may not be globally accepted but they are efficient and accurate despiteRead MoreAnalysis Of The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli1192 Words   |  5 Pagesthis: it was a duty to be the best. Niccolo Machiavelli, an Italian Humanist, wrote  The Prince  as a guide for his own prince, Lorenzo De Medici, to promote himself into the political arena of Italy. He analyzed power and the way Italy could become its own state and keep control. His extensive explanations were driven by his own fascination with power and his desire for an independent Italy. The Prince expresses the effectual truth of t hings and the idea that a prince must not be just and fair when comingRead MoreAnalysis Of The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli1020 Words   |  5 PagesInterestingly, Niccolo Machiavelli in his work The Prince would disagree. Written for the Medici lords, The Prince offers advice on how to obtain and rule a principality. To do this, he must first explain the nature of man and adjust the method of ruling them accordingly. Machiavelli believes humans by nature are corrupt, so the Prince must also be corrupt to succeed. 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His view on effective leadership was rather harsh and not exactly adopted in the Italian society. As a Renaissance citizen, Machiavelli proved his writing skills through a number of works such as short stories, plays, and histories. His more popular works included those call the Discourses on Livy and The Prince-which will be described further moreRead MoreEssay on Analysis of The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli517 Words   |  3 Pages The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli is about the origination of a prince. More or less how a prince can start from the bottom and become a great king or die at the feet of his people before reaching his prime. To become a prince there are many different ways which is explain in this book for example To arrive at this position depends not entirely on worth. Stating that there are a number of way you can become a prince by Favor of the people, but must maintain a healthy friendship and offer protectionRead MoreAn Analysis Of Niccolo Machiavelli s The Prince 941 Words   |  4 PagesNiccolo Machiavelli and Karl Marx developed theories concerning wealth and poverty in our society, as well as different types of governments. For instance, Machiavelli supported a capitalist economic system, unlike Marx, who embraced socialism in the society. Machiavelli wrote a book The Prince that explained how to be an effective leader. The theme of the book is the end justifies the means. A person could or should do whatever is necessary to achieve the desired goal. According to Machiavelli